Glass Maze Every jumbled pile of person

Posts Tagged Words

Beauregard

When we first met Beau his name was Lucky. That’s what the humane society had written on his nametag, at any rate. Lucky struck us then — and now, a decade later — as a pretty poor name for a dog who’d been marooned at the pound not once, but twice. He came up to […]


Prose That Takes Your Breath Away

This is some of the most powerful prose I’ve ever seen. It’s from a leaflet handed around during the 1992 primaries, written by Zoe Leonard, an artist and activist: I want a dyke for president. I want a person with aids for president and I want a fag for vice president and I want someone […]


Posted
6 October 2011 @ 7am

Tagged
Words

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs died last night. I saw the news as soon as it broke and then sat there, stunned, watching Twitter light up. All I felt at first was shock — and then, slowly, creeping in like a slow mist, sadness: deep and visceral and with me still. I didn’t expect to feel this way. […]


Mr Swift

Dave Eggers, in a lovely tribute to his high school English teacher, Mr Criche, remembers getting back a paper with a short note on it that basically changed his life. It said: “Sure hope you become a writer.” Over the next 10 years, I thought often about Mr. Criche’s six words. Whenever I felt discouraged, […]


Posted
3 August 2011 @ 8am

Tagged
Words

The Diner on the Edge of Hell

My new story, The Diner on the Edge of Hell, is out in the latest issue of Weird Tales. Happiness! Here’s an excerpt: Petrie shrugged and sat back, chewing placidly, and looked around the diner. It was a spotless, perfect stereotype of a diner: bright porcelain tiles, harsh fluorescent lights, a juke box, a pinball […]


Posted
3 March 2011 @ 10pm

Tagged
Words

Inherent Meaning is for the Weak

Love this, from an interview with Titus Andronicus’ Patrick Stickles: That’s the essence of reader response theory. There is no inherent meaning in a text. It’s what the reader makes of it, and authorial intention is irrelevant. Does that bother you? Yeah, it bothers me to the extent that the whole universe is like that, […]


The Death of the Printed Page

I’m nearing the end of two weeks of vacation. It’s an odd and disconcerting thing to have your days free, and I’ve tried to fill my time with constructive things: writing, chipping fecklessly away at various landfills of email, going to the gym, planning unconsummated trips to DC. Mostly it’s all just noise to stave […]


David Foster Wallace

John Moe: Being a writer in a world that features [David Foster] Wallace would be like playing basketball in a world that has Michael Jordan, only none of us even know how to play basketball and we’re all injured toddlers with broken lacrosse equipment.


Posted
6 August 2010 @ 3pm

Tagged
Words

Fiction & Empathy

Sometimes you hear people say that they don’t read fiction. Not that they don’t usually read fiction, or haven’t read fiction in a while, or don’t enjoy reading fiction. They don’t, as a matter of principle, read it at all. Nonfiction is ok, because nonfiction has facts, and you can use facts to improve yourself. […]


Posted
8 July 2010 @ 6am

Tagged
Silly, Words

Also, Simile of the Year

The winner of this year’s Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest, in which applicants compete to write the worst first sentence of novel: For the first month of Ricardo and Felicity’s affair, they greeted one another at every stolen rendezvous with a kiss — a lengthy, ravenous kiss, Ricardo lapping and sucking at Felicity’s mouth as if she […]


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